You Are Often The Worst Judge Of Your Own Ideas

The funny thing about deep thoughts and great ideas is that they often don’t appear so deep at the beginning. They emerge as slow hunches, in the language of [amazon_link id=”1594485380″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Steven Johnson[/amazon_link], and thus often seem obvious at the point at which they are first recognized to be of some value.

However, the value of an idea often becomes apparent only with some distance, and then over time it proves itself through adoption and repetition within its intended audience. It’s actually through emulation that ideas are often proven worthy of attention. The ideas that find their way into the conversations and processes of others are often the very ones that have been selected by the group to be adoptable and practical. Thus, the creator is often the worst judge of the value of their own creation.

This is why it’s so important to have sounding boards, circles, and groups of peers who can offer feedback on your work. Something that is obvious to you may not be obvious to others, while something that you think is profound might be opaque or impractical. Who tells you the truth?

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I'm Todd Henry.

I'm Todd Henry.

I write books, speak internationally on productivity, creativity, leadership, and passion for work, and help people and teams generate brilliant ideas. More

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I write books, speak internationally on productivity, creativity, leadership, and passion for work, and help people and teams generate brilliant ideas.

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